Car Insurance

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Carole Nash Car Insurance

Whether you drive on four wheels or ride on two, Carole Nash has a policy to suit you

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van driving on road

Keeping you on the road

Carole Nash Van Insurance

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Yamaha MT 09 Motorbike with mountains in background

WIN a Yamaha MT-09 worth £10,000

Get a quote to be in with a chance to WIN!

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Active policyholders at the end of the prize draw will be automatically entered. The prize draw closes at 23:59 on the 31st of October 2024. Entrants must be aged 21 and over, residents of the UK and have a full motorcycle licence. Full Terms and Conditions apply.

Are you experiencing financial difficulty? Find out how we could help.

 

 

Motorbike & Classic Car Insurance

At Carole Nash, we’re proud to be one of the UK’s leading motorbike and classic car insurance brokers, so you’ll always have complete peace of mind.

As an insurance broker, we offer a wide range of policies – not just for bike insurance and classic car insurance but also cover for travel, vans and more.

Don't just take our word for it...

Based on reviews of all products

24/7 access to motorbike claims specialists, recovery & repairs

Our promise to you...

  • 24/7 motorbike expert claims line
  • Text updates on your claims
  • No forms to fill in
  • Approved repairers as part of the service

Claims

How to make a claim with Carole Nash

Sadly, accidents can happen and when they do, the last thing you need is to go through a complicated claims procedure. Here at Carole Nash, we’ve made the process as simple as possible, so you don’t have to worry.

Read more Bike Tips, Tips & Guides

Recovery & repairs

Recovery & repairs after an accident

By taking out motorbike insurance through Carole Nash, you’ll have access to specialist, approved repairers. We also offer UK & European breakdown cover as standard, so you can feel protected whether riding at home or on the continent.

Read more Bike Tips, Tips & Guides

 

 

Carole Nash provide much more than just motorbike insurance

Carole Nash - Classic car & motorcycle insurance specialists

We’ve been providing bike insurance and classic car insurance for more than 30 years, so you can rest assured you’re dealing with people who’ve seen it all before.

As of December 2023, we have a rating of ‘Excellent’ from over 22,000 customer reviews of all products on Trustpilot. Why not read some of our testimonials to see what others have had to say about our service.

We appreciate that your motorcycle or classic car is your pride and joy, and that you may require very particular cover. With Carole Nash, you can be sure that we’ll fully understand your needs, no matter how specific they may be.

We’re authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority under firm reference number 307243.

Our team are extremely well-informed and boast extensive expertise regarding classic car and motorcycle insurance. They’ll try to help you find the solution.

Keep up to date with the latest news

How to corner brake on a motorcycle

Corner_Brake_1

The golden rule is to do your braking on the straight bit of road, before the corner. But we all know it doesn’t always go like that – situations develop quickly, and sometimes we need to brake mid- corner. But that’s ok, because if done correctly, it’s perfectly safe. Of course, you can’t stamp on the brakes in a corner like you can on a straight, but if you know what you’re doing, you can slow down in a controlled way.

With visions of losing control and ending up in a hedge with our bikes, we had a chat with Will Blewett from Phoenix Motorcycle Training, the UK’s largest motorcycle training provider, to get our heads around this black magic of braking mid-corner.

 

Corner_Brake_2

 

How to brake in a bend on a motorcycle

First, let’s see what you should NOT do if you want to brake in a corner and stay upright. The first thing is braking too harshly with the front brake, losing grip, and lowsiding the bike. You need to be very smooth with the braking action in a corner.

The second is not braking enough. If you do it right, you can actually put quite a bit of pressure on the brakes. Just remember to be very smooth with it.

It’s also not a good idea to use the rear brake if you are riding at pace. It’s very easy to lose grip and slide if you do that.  

 

Corner_Brake_3

 

As we mentioned in the beginning, the easiest thing to do is to try brake before the corner. If you can do that, you will keep the bike much more stable through the turn. Naturally, that’s of little help if you are in a corner and suddenly need to slow down. So, what you can do is apply the front brake smoothly in the corner.

When you do this, the bike will want to ‘stand up’ and go straight, so you need to counter-steer to keep the line. However, it’s a fine balance; there’s only a finite amount of grip available, and the more you use for braking the less there is for turning. When you run out of grip, only the likes of Marc Márquez can keep the bike shiny side up.

 

Corner_Brake_4

 

 

If you have space, and it’s safe to do so, you can let the bike sit up and straighten the line under braking.  This will help you stop sooner, but you will be off your intended line, so you need to be sure that it’s clear.

It’s not all about mechanics though. Looking where you want to go is important too. Target fixation is a common problem, and if you stare at something you don’t want to hit, the chances are that you will be heading exactly that way. Instead, try to scan your surroundings, find an exit route, and concentrate on that.

 

Corner_Brake_5

 

One final tool at your disposal, as you are entering a corner, is trail braking. This is what racers tend to do on track, but the same principle works on the roads too. It’s not easy though, and getting it wrong will end up badly. Essentially, what you do in trail braking is to brake hard as you approach the corner, then gradually release the brakes as you steer into it. The idea is to balance braking and cornering forces, getting close to the tyres’ limits without asking too much of them at any point. It’s effective, but we can’t emphasise this enough, it’s difficult, and can go wrong rather easily.

At the end of the day, the best approach is always to do your braking before the corner, but if you need to hit the brakes mid-corner, hopefully the above advice will help you. Just remember to practice somewhere safe, before you need to do it for real. Since this is a tricky skill to practice safely in public spaces, you may want to join a professional skills day, such as the streetSKILLS 101 training day where you improve your technique, and get accurate data about how you’re doing too.

 

Corner_Brake_6

Biking Tips

 

 

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Motorbike tips

How to corner brake on a motorcycle

Is it safe to brake in a corner? Won’t you fall off? If you follow these tips, you’ll master the skill in no time…

Read more Biking Tips

How to corner brake on a motorcycle

Corner_Brake_1

The golden rule is to do your braking on the straight bit of road, before the corner. But we all know it doesn’t always go like that – situations develop quickly, and sometimes we need to brake mid- corner. But that’s ok, because if done correctly, it’s perfectly safe. Of course, you can’t stamp on the brakes in a corner like you can on a straight, but if you know what you’re doing, you can slow down in a controlled way.

With visions of losing control and ending up in a hedge with our bikes, we had a chat with Will Blewett from Phoenix Motorcycle Training, the UK’s largest motorcycle training provider, to get our heads around this black magic of braking mid-corner.

 

Corner_Brake_2

 

How to brake in a bend on a motorcycle

First, let’s see what you should NOT do if you want to brake in a corner and stay upright. The first thing is braking too harshly with the front brake, losing grip, and lowsiding the bike. You need to be very smooth with the braking action in a corner.

The second is not braking enough. If you do it right, you can actually put quite a bit of pressure on the brakes. Just remember to be very smooth with it.

It’s also not a good idea to use the rear brake if you are riding at pace. It’s very easy to lose grip and slide if you do that.  

 

Corner_Brake_3

 

As we mentioned in the beginning, the easiest thing to do is to try brake before the corner. If you can do that, you will keep the bike much more stable through the turn. Naturally, that’s of little help if you are in a corner and suddenly need to slow down. So, what you can do is apply the front brake smoothly in the corner.

When you do this, the bike will want to ‘stand up’ and go straight, so you need to counter-steer to keep the line. However, it’s a fine balance; there’s only a finite amount of grip available, and the more you use for braking the less there is for turning. When you run out of grip, only the likes of Marc Márquez can keep the bike shiny side up.

 

Corner_Brake_4

 

 

If you have space, and it’s safe to do so, you can let the bike sit up and straighten the line under braking.  This will help you stop sooner, but you will be off your intended line, so you need to be sure that it’s clear.

It’s not all about mechanics though. Looking where you want to go is important too. Target fixation is a common problem, and if you stare at something you don’t want to hit, the chances are that you will be heading exactly that way. Instead, try to scan your surroundings, find an exit route, and concentrate on that.

 

Corner_Brake_5

 

One final tool at your disposal, as you are entering a corner, is trail braking. This is what racers tend to do on track, but the same principle works on the roads too. It’s not easy though, and getting it wrong will end up badly. Essentially, what you do in trail braking is to brake hard as you approach the corner, then gradually release the brakes as you steer into it. The idea is to balance braking and cornering forces, getting close to the tyres’ limits without asking too much of them at any point. It’s effective, but we can’t emphasise this enough, it’s difficult, and can go wrong rather easily.

At the end of the day, the best approach is always to do your braking before the corner, but if you need to hit the brakes mid-corner, hopefully the above advice will help you. Just remember to practice somewhere safe, before you need to do it for real. Since this is a tricky skill to practice safely in public spaces, you may want to join a professional skills day, such as the streetSKILLS 101 training day where you improve your technique, and get accurate data about how you’re doing too.

 

Corner_Brake_6

Biking Tips

How to corner brake on a motorcycle

Corner_Brake_1

The golden rule is to do your braking on the straight bit of road, before the corner. But we all know it doesn’t always go like that – situations develop quickly, and sometimes we need to brake mid- corner. But that’s ok, because if done correctly, it’s perfectly safe. Of course, you can’t stamp on the brakes in a corner like you can on a straight, but if you know what you’re doing, you can slow down in a controlled way.

With visions of losing control and ending up in a hedge with our bikes, we had a chat with Will Blewett from Phoenix Motorcycle Training, the UK’s largest motorcycle training provider, to get our heads around this black magic of braking mid-corner.

 

Corner_Brake_2

 

How to brake in a bend on a motorcycle

First, let’s see what you should NOT do if you want to brake in a corner and stay upright. The first thing is braking too harshly with the front brake, losing grip, and lowsiding the bike. You need to be very smooth with the braking action in a corner.

The second is not braking enough. If you do it right, you can actually put quite a bit of pressure on the brakes. Just remember to be very smooth with it.

It’s also not a good idea to use the rear brake if you are riding at pace. It’s very easy to lose grip and slide if you do that.  

 

Corner_Brake_3

 

As we mentioned in the beginning, the easiest thing to do is to try brake before the corner. If you can do that, you will keep the bike much more stable through the turn. Naturally, that’s of little help if you are in a corner and suddenly need to slow down. So, what you can do is apply the front brake smoothly in the corner.

When you do this, the bike will want to ‘stand up’ and go straight, so you need to counter-steer to keep the line. However, it’s a fine balance; there’s only a finite amount of grip available, and the more you use for braking the less there is for turning. When you run out of grip, only the likes of Marc Márquez can keep the bike shiny side up.

 

Corner_Brake_4

 

 

If you have space, and it’s safe to do so, you can let the bike sit up and straighten the line under braking.  This will help you stop sooner, but you will be off your intended line, so you need to be sure that it’s clear.

It’s not all about mechanics though. Looking where you want to go is important too. Target fixation is a common problem, and if you stare at something you don’t want to hit, the chances are that you will be heading exactly that way. Instead, try to scan your surroundings, find an exit route, and concentrate on that.

 

Corner_Brake_5

 

One final tool at your disposal, as you are entering a corner, is trail braking. This is what racers tend to do on track, but the same principle works on the roads too. It’s not easy though, and getting it wrong will end up badly. Essentially, what you do in trail braking is to brake hard as you approach the corner, then gradually release the brakes as you steer into it. The idea is to balance braking and cornering forces, getting close to the tyres’ limits without asking too much of them at any point. It’s effective, but we can’t emphasise this enough, it’s difficult, and can go wrong rather easily.

At the end of the day, the best approach is always to do your braking before the corner, but if you need to hit the brakes mid-corner, hopefully the above advice will help you. Just remember to practice somewhere safe, before you need to do it for real. Since this is a tricky skill to practice safely in public spaces, you may want to join a professional skills day, such as the streetSKILLS 101 training day where you improve your technique, and get accurate data about how you’re doing too.

 

Corner_Brake_6

Biking Tips

 

 

What type of insurance do Carole Nash provide?

As an insurance broker, we can help you in securing a whole range of policies, but where we’ve really made a name for ourselves is as motorbike and classic car insurance specialists.

We’ve helped provide motorcycle insurance for over 200,000 bikes and scooters in the UK and Ireland for over three decades, so you can be sure you’re partnering with specialists who boast a wealth of experience.

Being a part of the biking community is very important to us. We love talking to bikers whilst out and about, and that helps us tune into your specific needs when it comes to insuring your ride. We can secure bike cover for classic models, those which are custom built, superbikes, scooters, mopeds and more.

This type of cover is available in three levels: third party; third party, fire and theft; and comprehensive. If you think we can help you find the right policy, why not give us a call on 0333 005 3355 or get a free online quote for motorbike insurance.

We understand that classic cars are not like any other vehicle, which is why you need the right cover to protect your prized possession. If your car is more than 15 years old, then it could be deemed a classic, and we’re here to try and help you find the policy that meets your needs.

Classic car insurance there are two types of cover available: fully comprehensive and laid up. We appreciate that owners of classic models often require very specific modifications or repairs to be carried out. Because of this, it’s important that you take out the appropriate policy. So, if you’d like to speak to us about classic car insurance, you can call us on 0333 005 2295. Alternatively, you can get a quote online for free in a matter of minutes.

As well as providing motorbike and classic car insurance quotes, we can help you with many other forms of cover, including:

Car insurance
Van insurance
Travel insurance

You can check out the full range of other insurance we provide.