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Inside Bikes

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Motorcycle Live 2017

 

Bikes For Stand

  • Phil Morris – Moto GP (Start up)
  • Mike Noble – Harley Davison
  • Vic and Lin – Harley Custom
  • Energica – Tricolour
  • Carole Nash - Susuki RE58

 

Phil Morris – Moto GP (Start up) - Bike Specs

PBM GP14 MOTO GP RACING BIKE 1000cc/aprilla V4

   

Value 

500,000.

Year 

2014

Owner 

PHIL MORRIS/OSWESTRY ROAD RACING MUSEUM

Engine 

1000 cc

Power 

220BHP

Torque 

Over 220hp

Top speed 

330kh/h                                      

Transmission 

6 Speed Transmission            

Chassis 

PBM Twin Spar-Aluminum

Wheelbase 

 

Dry weight 

162kg

Seat height 

 

Tank capacity 

24 Liters

Interesting Fact 

Michael Laverty’s Moto GP Bike

 

Phil Morris – Moto GP (Start up) - Bike Blog

 

Awesome Aprilia!

 

This Aprilia 1000CC V4 16 Valve monster is, in the words of Motorcycle News, one of “the best V4s you can actually own.” And while you can’t own this blistering 2014 PBM specimen (unless you have a spare £500,000 lying around), it epitomises everything that is awesome about this model.

 

Owned by Phil Morris/Oswestry Road Racing Museum, this is the actual machine ridden by former ‘Irish motorcyclist of the year’ Michael Laverty, in the MotoGP world championship series.

 

Monstrously fast, the 220bhp V4 is an Italian rocket, with an eye-popping top speed of 330 kh/h. At those speeds, even the 24-litre fuel tank won’t last very long!

The advanced electronics are powered by Magneti Marelli software, with Ohlins suspension and Brembo bakes to keep you safe in the saddle.

 

At 162 kg (dry weight) it’s no lightweight, but with a six-speed transmission, the Michelin tyres will have their work cut out keeping the twin-spar aluminium chassis on the track!

 

Mike Noble – Bike Specs

 

The Nightrod GTR

   

Value 

£40,000

Year 

2014

Owner 

Geraint Williams

Engine 

1250cc Revolution Harley-Davidson

Power 

130bhp

Torque 

105NM

Top speed 

 

Transmission 

5 Speed

Chassis 

 

Wheelbase 

1702mm

Dry weight 

289kg

Seat height 

 

Tank capacity 

 

Interesting Fact 

Built in house by Guildford Custom the custom motorcycle department at Guildford Harley-Davidson. The Night Rod GTR By Michael Noble & David Presley.

 

2450mm in length, at a guess the handle bars are no more than 895mm wide, the rear tire is 280mm wide, the weight is approx. 310kg

Mike Noble – Bike Blog

Night rodHarley-Davidson Night Rod GTR: a magnificent beast

Built by Michael Noble and David Presley, the brains behind the award-winning Guilford Custom, this Harley-Davidson is a magnificent example of a modern muscle bike.

With a dry weight of 289kg, a torque of 105 Nm and 130bhp, it’s certainly no slouch. The 1250cc Revolution Harley-Davidson engine makes sure of that.

But it’s the sheer size that makes this bike simply unmissable.

Noble and Presley wanted a muscle bike with a “low but large presence”. Mission accomplished! From the eye-catching one-piece body pained by Image Design Custom in a two-tone gloss and matt black, through to the custom-made 260mm Roland Sands Diesel Wheel, you’ll be left open-jawed at the sheer might behind this machine.

Inspired by the Mercedes GTR, it releases a full and deep exhaust tone – thanks in part to the Vance & Hines 2-into-1 Competition Pipe.

Metzler tyres and Legend air suspension complete the final appearance of this £40,000 beauty. It’s well worth checking out!

Bike Specs – Destiny Cycles

 

Customer commissioned bike which will be unveiled for the first time at Motorcycle Live 2017 on the Carole Nash stand

Dyna style bike with 124 cubic inch motor and 5 speed transmission.  Totally bespoke build.

   

Value 

£50,000

Year 

2018

Owner 

Nick Lord

Engine 

S&S 124 cu in

Power 

135 hp

Torque 

140

Top speed 

130mph

Transmission 

6 speed

Chassis 

Destiny Cycles Dyna style frame and swing arm

Wheelbase 

 

Dry weight 

340 kg

Seat height 

27”

Tank capacity 

16 litres

Interesting Fact 

First Dyna style frame to come out of the Destiny Cycles workshop

 

  • Length 91”
  • Width  30”
  • Weight  240kg

Destiny Cycles – Bike Blog

 

Bespoke Dyna-style bike looks set to be a crowd-pleaser

Head down to the Carole Nash stand at Motorcycle Live 2017 and you’re bound to find something you’ve never seen before.

 That’s because this £50,000 bespoke Dyna-style bike will be unveiled for the first time – and it’s sure to leave you breathless.

 Owned and commissioned by Nick Lord, it clocks 130mph from 135 bhp of power and a torque of 140 Nm. And despite the bike’s whopping dry weight of 340kg, the 124-cubic-inch S&S engine gives the ride plenty of oomph.

 A five-speed [W1] transmission, a 27-inch seat height and a Destiny Cycles Dyna-style frame and swing arm add the magnificent finishing touches.

 This is the first Dyna-style frame to come out of the Destiny Cycles workshop – and on this evidence, we can’t wait to see what’s next!

TriColour – Bike Specs

Value 

£36,000

Year 

2017

Owner 

Moto Corsa Ltd

Engine 

It’s Electric

Power 

Equivalent 136 bhp

Torque 

195nm DA 0 RPM A 4700 RPM

Top speed 

Restricted to 150 mph (Limited @ 240kmh)

Transmission 

Automatic

Chassis 

Steel Tubular Trellis

Wheelbase 

1482mm

Dry weight 

286kg

Seat height 

810mm

Tank capacity 

Don’t be silly

Interesting Fact 

First EV Production bike to complete a TT Zero Race, 2017. Adam Childs MCN

                                           

Length: 2131mm

Width: 832mm

Weight 286kg

 

TriColour - Bike Blog

 

Energica EVO: the ultimate green machine!

Energica only entered the UK market in 2016, but they’ve already made plenty of waves. With bikes like the fully electric Energica EVO, it’s not hard to see why.

 

Coming from a team of performance engineers that have been operating in Formula One Racing and Le Mans 24h for more than 40 years, you’d expect it to be quick. And it doesn’t disappoint – in part due to a torque of 195 Nm ranging from 0 rpm to 4700 rpm.

 

Its dry weight of 286kg makes it a bit of beast, but it’s got plenty of zip, ripping from 0mph to 60mph in just three seconds with the equivalent power of 136 bhp. In fact, it’s so quick it’s faster than a 600 Supersport! And while its top speed is restricted, it can still climb to 150mph before your progress is stopped.

 

The sophisticated vehicle control unit (VCU) also catches the eye, monitoring and managing the battery, inverter, charger and ABS in a single entity.

 

With a starting price of £27,999 (going up to £32,999 for the basic TriColor model), it’s not cheap. But it’s within the reach of some – and going green with this beauty has never been so much fun.

Suzuki RE58 – Bike Specs

 

Suzuki RE5 Rotary

   

Value 

13000

Year 

1976

Owner 

Carole Nash

Engine 

498cc – liquid/air cooled rotary

Power 

62bhp @ 6,500rpm

Torque 

74.5Nm @ 3,500rpm

Top speed 

220mph

Transmission 

Manual

Chassis 

Steel tubular cradle

Wheelbase 

1500mm

Dry weight 

230kg

Tank capacity 

16.8 litres

Interesting Fact 

Restored by Prison Inmates on behalf of Carole Nash

 

Susuki RE58 – Bike Blog

 

Suzuki’s futuristic RE5 was introduced with a fanfare in 1974, with its space age Dan Dare styling and novel Wankel rotary engine pointing to a future that would ultimately never arrive.

 

While the RE5’s chassis was conventional by contemporary standards, the rotary engine was a real novelty. The concept of the rotary engine was conceived by German engineer Felix Wankel, whose first patent was issued in 1929, although the first mainstream uses were in the 1960s, when NSU (the forebearer to Audi) built rotary engined cars and motorcycles.

 

The concept appeared to be tailor made for motorcycles, with rotary engines delivering high power outputs from a small and lightweight engine, and by the 1970s all of the Japanese manufacturers were reported to be working on rotary powered motorcycles.

 

Suzuki was the first (and ultimately only) one to make it to the market and the company commissioned famous Italian designer Giorgetto Giugiaro, noted for his work with Ferrari and Maserati, to style the RE5. Giugiaro created an unusual ‘tin can’ design for the instruments, which flipped open when the key was turned, for the RE5M model, although more conventional styling was adopted for the American ‘A’ version. This more traditional styling became universal for the 1976 ‘B’ version.

 

This particular example is from 1976 and was purchased as a non-runner several decades ago by company founder Carole Nash, who donated it to a prison project that provided vocational training to inmates. The bike was fully restored behind bars and has been recently taken out of storage and recommissioned.

 

Although only produced in 1975 and 1976, the RE5 is a significant model in the world of motorcycling. History will show it to have been a relative failure, as the futuristic styling, complex mechanicals, poor fuel consumption and high price put off prospective buyers. It was, however, praised for its good handling and paved the way for a decade of innovation from Japanese manufacturers, which saw technology such as fairings, turbos, anti-dive suspension and much, much more be introduced – evolving into the motorcycles we have come to know and love today.

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