Carole Nash
Content Writer
Published: 20th November 2019
author

Supercars are among the finest vehicles in the classic car world. They have a great mixture of performance, engineering and style. The Maserati Bora has earned a reputation for being one of the greatest supercars in history. It came out at a time when Maserati were known for developing vehicles that were behind the times technologically. We’re looking into how the Bora was designed.

Origins

After Citroen took control of Maserati in 1968, a concept for a two-seat sports car was proposed. The market had its fair share of supercars like the Lamborghini De Tomaso and Miura Mangusta. Maserati started developing a prototype with the aim of eclipsing anything that had come before it.

First known as the Tipo 117, the name changed to Bora. The car came with a variety of innovative features that set it apart from other vehicles. The Bora had a hydraulically powered pedal cluster that could be moved backwards and forward, while the steering wheel could be tilted and telescoped. This solved the problem of entering and exiting a vehicle that was common in a lot of supercars.

Other important features were the full-size boot and interior space. Compared to other supercars, the Bora was practical and stylish. It came with dual-pane glass that separated the cabin from the engine compartment. This reduced the noise of the 171 mph V8 engine, offering greater comfort for the driver.

Performance

The original Bora had a 4719 cc engine, with a higher torque of 4930 cc being offered later on. Citroen incorporated advanced high-pressure LHM hydraulics to improve the performance. Initially, the Bora weighed 1400 kg, but noise and safety concerns increased it to 1535 kg. 

The Bora stood out as a distinctive car that had a brushed stainless steel roof, spacious bucket seats, stylish door trim and sleek body. It debuted at the Geneva Salon in 1971 to an amazing public reaction. Bora production lasted until 1978, as Maserati struggled after being bought out by De Tomaso in 1975. 

The Bora remains a fine example of a supercar that changed public perception on Maserati.