CLASSIC TRIUMPH INSURANCE

THE CLASSIC TRIUMPH

The Triumph name holds a special place in the affections of many a classic car enthusiast. It’s not hard to see why.

Car production commenced in 1924, but it was with the 1927 Triumph Super Seven that the company truly hit its stride. Models such as the Super 9, the Gloria and the first Dolomite followed, and Triumph also supplied engines for Jaguar’s SS range.

After the Second World War, the company was purchased by The Standard Motor Company and, after producing the Roadster, Renown and Mayflower, the golden era of Triumph began. This was when the company thrilled the motoring public with the TR series of sports cars, the Herald, Spitfire and Vitesse models, the Dolomite/Toledo range and, of course, the Stag. They followed up with the 2000 and 2500 family saloons and, in what transpired to be the marque’s swan song, the Acclaim.

WHICH TRIUMPH?

Over the years, Triumph produced a car to suit almost everyone, so there’s sure to be one out there to fit your lifestyle.

You can experience the luxurious splendour of 1930s family motoring in a Triumph Gloria Six, or a touch of 1940s quirkiness with the Triumph Roadster, complete with dickie seat and extra windscreen. If your passion is for 1950s sports cars (and you only require two seats), there’s little to match the tough mechanical specification and rugged good looks of the TR2, TR3 and TR3A.

Move into the 1960s, and there’s a bewildering variety of models to choose from. The Herald and Vitesse offer compact, four-seat, classic 60s motoring whilst their associated Spitfire and GT6 models are perfect if you’re looking for a small, two-seat sports car. In addition, there’s the Michelotti-designed beauty of the larger TR4, TR4A, TR5 and TR6 sports cars, not to mention the medium-sized 1300/1500 saloon range.

From the ’60s through to the ’70s, the big 6-cylinder 2000 and 2500 saloons and estates can seat five people in comfort, and offer smooth reminders of great times.

Staying in the 1970s we find the brash V8-engined Triumph Stag, the Dolomite and Toledo range, Spitfire Mk IV/ GT6 MKIII and of course, the TR7 and TR8 which take us into the 1980s. Here, the wonderful Triumph story comes to a close with the Honda-based Acclaim.

BUYING AND OWNING A TRIUMPH

The toughest part will probably be choosing from the bewildering range of classic Triumphs available because, apart from the pre-war cars, there are usually plenty out there. Dealers, internet sales and auction sites and classic car publications are all great places to study the market, as are the various Triumph club sites and magazines.

You can become a proud Triumph owner for as little as a few hundred pounds, but prices can reach £50,000 for the very best TR5s. So it all comes down to your budget – as usual!

Spare parts and accessories are widely available for most post 1952 Triumphs, making them very easy to live with.

Most models are relatively easy to work on, with the bolt together Herald, Vitesse, Spitfire range being the simplest of all.

Always look out for corrosion problems and seek expert advice if you’re unsure.

When it comes to insurance, always look for specialist advice and speak to someone who understands your pride and joy.

TRIUMPH INSURANCE WITH SALVAGE RETENTION

If you are looking to insure your Triumph, insurance policies through Carole Nash include a number of features
as standard, including:

  • Salvage retention rights
  • Discounts for club members
  • Choose your own specialist repairer
  • UK & EU breakdown worth £100 &  includes Homestart
  • Up to £100,000 legal protection if you’re in an accident that’s not your fault
  • European cover up to 90 days
  • Dedicated claims team available 24/7, 365 days a year
  • Flexible payment options to suit your budget